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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone,

I've been a member for just a short time but have really enjoyed the site and all of the great information from people. I figure that I might add a little bit to this.

Years ago one of my best friends (and Army buddies) and I started going out to the mountains of places like TN and KY for 4-5 days at a time and camped off of our rigs (we both started with Grizzlies and both also have Rhinos). Over the years, we have perfected packing and all but recently made a big jump in communications.

When scouting for camp sites, we would often find a common point of meeting and agree on a short jaunt of no more than 5 min or 5 clicks to find a site, then return with a report of our findings. This put some distance between us for a bit which isn't the safest, but at least we're both experienced riders and survival trained.

For ease of communication we now wear Midland FRS/GMRS radios. With these we can stay in touch and call the other for help if needed (or direct them to come to a found site). Needless to say, this is a HUGE improvement!

The radios are compatible with other radios, which is great for when we bring a larger group and it also adds a lot of safety. We run headsets under our helmets and the setup works great (they'll never reach the advertised 36 mile range, so be aware of that). I will post some photos for reference but would recommend that anyone who travels out of line of sight from their group have a way to communicate reliably (aka not relying on cell comm). This is just my .02.

If you all have some cool ways of doing this, post em up!

Ride safely and have fun!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
**UPDATE**

Here's a quick photo of the radios we run and the headset that we use. Also, here are some pros and cons for all of you making some considerations toward going this route:


PROS:
  • Good Range (effective for miles, depending on terrain)
  • Reliable (works out of cell range and in many other SHTF scenarios)
  • Lightweight (lighter than a CB)
  • Inexpensive (about $50 for the pair, including headsets, rechargable batteries, AC and DC charging equip)
  • Compatible with other radios (works with other brand FRS/GMRS radios)
  • Handy (I carry a pair in my truck everyday too, incase the need arises - I'm often surprised by how often they're used and what for)
  • Tough/Weather resistant (they take beating and can get a little wet - just don't take them swimming - especially with the headset plugged in, it's not a good scenario since the headset plugs aren't waterproof)
  • Has weather band and weather alert function (nice to have for many reasons)
  • Hands-free operation with VOX
  • Have the ability to call on specific radio in your group, or all (nice when you need to contact just one member of your group)
  • Anyone can use them (once set up, a toddler can use these)
CONS:
  • Not as widely used as CBs
  • Not typically monitored by rescue personnel (Forest Rangers, etc)
  • Carrying the manual is almost a must to ensure compatibility with other brands if using privacy codes (privacy code numbers don't usually match, so you'll have to look at the number vs. actual code)
  • SHOULD have a license for using high-power (5W) GMRS - cost about $85
  • Unlicensed FRS channels can get a bit crowded in some cases (depending on where you are and who around you uses these freq.)
Anyway, I hope that this sparks some ideas for some and helps keep others safe and enjoying their time off of the couch! :fingersx:
 

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