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Anyone get there Rhino street legal in Washington state? Im sure I can get it done, just wondering if anyone else has. Thanks
 

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From what I understand there is NO way to license an OHV in Washington. Specific laws prohibit this and the Rhino title identifies it as an OHV. Of course if most of your riding is done in ,say, Montana...and your folks still live there...(wink wink). I haven't run down the road in WA with my plate yet (I made a couple bonzai runs to the local mini-mart when our road was under construction but the cops weren't patrolling it then). I'm thinking it would be a very gray area for an officer because it IS licensed.
 

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My Rhino is licensed street legal in Az. both on/off road plates, we go to Wa. in the summer, looks like I cant ride it on the street there?
 

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Keep in mind that I wrote that last comment nearly 6 years ago. I don't know if things have changed in Washington. I would suggest you contact the Sheriff for the area you intend to visit and see what his stance is.
 

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Actually, the law has changed. There is now a provision where certain towns can set their own rules in regards to ATV use on the streets. Again, I would check with the local Sheriff for wherever you plan to be.
 

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Thank you, I did look up the general law about so called " off road vechicles " basically it said " dont even think about it! " But I will certainly check the local area where we will be. We have converted many dirt bikes to street, so far no problems with that. To me the Rhino is like a Jeep.Bill, Az.
 

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Wow, I will take a look, thanks again. Where do you live? We leave Az. and go to Silverdale, Wa. in the summer, also lived in Troy, And Hamilton Mt. I see you posted locations in the Northwest also.
 

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I grew up near Troy, MT. Now I live near Spokane, WA but all of my riding is done in North Idaho and Western MT.
 

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We tried to move to Moses Lake to be closer to our two sons, and thinking it would be drier and not as cold...WRONG we went back to Az. in less than a year!! Although they do have some good dunes nearby Moses.
 

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I live near Port Orchard Wa. I am getting mine licensed however the area hasn't approved them yet. It seems you can license them, and drive them on more rural streets as most officers won't do anything unless you are causing trouble or speeding. However be prepared for a ticket as they aren't locally legal. Talking to a couple of the leaders in getting them legalized, they are slowly gaining progress...

So in short, yes you can license them, no they are not legal in all counties, however seems they aren't bugged unless your being mischievous and or in a more populized area with heavy traffic.
 

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Mines plated in AZ and I drive it on the street in AZ, NV and CA. No one cares as long as I have my helmet/windshield, seat belts and I'm not driving like Camshaw...
 

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Anyway why do we need a plate, I forget? :147:

All kidding aside, driving a rhino on hard asphalt or concrete for a long period of time hurts the rhino, regardless of your setup. That I know. :amish:
 

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Anyway why do we need a plate, I forget? :147:

All kidding aside, driving a rhino on hard asphalt or concrete for a long period of time hurts the rhino, regardless of your setup. That I know. :amish:
Would you like to elaborate as to why?
 

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Anyway why do we need a plate, I forget? :147:

All kidding aside, driving a rhino on hard asphalt or concrete for a long period of time hurts the rhino, regardless of your setup. That I know. :amish:
Would you like to elaborate as to why?
It boils down to the lack of any true differentials at the rear, front and in between. The rear drive gearbox has the axles locked together at all times (a solid spool connects them together). When on pavement you certainly want to be in 2 wheel drive. Even then, when you deviate from a straight ahead direction, the rear tires have to slip on the pavement to make that turn. When you are turning the tire toward the inside of the turn has to rotate slower than the tire on the outside of the turn. This puts a lot of strain on the axles and CV joints. I would expect that street tires actually aggravate the situation because they have more traction on smooth pavement than aggressive lugged tires (more rubber in contact with the pavement).

Putting the machine in 4WD locks only one of the front wheels into the drive train. The other front wheel is freewheeling in this configuration. Even so, there is now also strain in the drive shafts between the front and rear gearboxes. However, it is not true 4 wheel drive, but rather 3 wheel drive.

When you lock the front "differential" the two front wheels are then locked to each other via a sort of "dog clutch" (protruding lugs on one axle shaft dropping into recessed cavities on the other axle shaft). Now, this is true 4 wheel drive with no give in the drive train. All 4 tires must skid on the ground as the machine makes a turn, as all 4 wheels want to at different rates as the machine is making the turn. This is why the steering is so difficult and fights back when the machine is in the front "differential" locked mode.
 

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Anyway why do we need a plate, I forget? :147:

All kidding aside, driving a rhino on hard asphalt or concrete for a long period of time hurts the rhino, regardless of your setup. That I know. :amish:
Would you like to elaborate as to why?
It boils down to the lack of any true differentials at the rear, front and in between. The rear drive gearbox has the axles locked together at all times (a solid spool connects them together). When on pavement you certainly want to be in 2 wheel drive. Even then, when you deviate from a straight ahead direction, the rear tires have to slip on the pavement to make that turn. When you are turning the tire toward the inside of the turn has to rotate slower than the tire on the outside of the turn. This puts a lot of strain on the axles and CV joints. I would expect that street tires actually aggravate the situation because they have more traction on smooth pavement than aggressive lugged tires (more rubber in contact with the pavement).

Putting the machine in 4WD locks only one of the front wheels into the drive train. The other front wheel is freewheeling in this configuration. Even so, there is now also strain in the drive shafts between the front and rear gearboxes. However, it is not true 4 wheel drive, but rather 3 wheel drive.

When you lock the front "differential" the two front wheels are then locked to each other via a sort of "dog clutch" (protruding lugs on one axle shaft dropping into recessed cavities on the other axle shaft). Now, this is true 4 wheel drive with no give in the drive train. All 4 tires must skid on the ground as the machine makes a turn, as all 4 wheels want to at different rates as the machine is making the turn. This is why the steering is so difficult and fights back when the machine is in the front "differential" locked mode.
Thanks Steve! Very nice explanation! So it boils down to this; "when on pavement keep it in 2WD and don't make any turns just drive straight"
 
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