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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a used, 2006 Rhino with the 660 and am surprised how long it takes to get it started each morning (I use it around the property, so start it basically each morning). Here's what happens:

At first crank, it fires up for 3-5 seconds and then dies (choked or not, doesn't matter).

To get it restarted, I have to hold the ignition to start for 10 seconds, release, and repeat... takes either 2 or 3 times (maybe average of 20 seconds of having the starter turning over).

Seems to me the first 3-5 seconds is because of fuel leftover from previous day's use, but once it goes through the engine, there's no fuel in the system.

I replaced the fuel filter and air filter and added some carb cleaner, but none of that seems to have helped. I have no clue how the fuel vacuum system should work in the fuel line, but seems like the problem may be there somewhere... once fuel gets to the engine, seems to run great, so best I can tell is I'm having trouble getting initial fuel to the engine, and wondering if it's because I'm losing fuel from the line (no fuel spilling on ground, so that's good).

Any help would be GREATLY appreciated!!
 

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That's excessive in my experience. It takes me that long to start after sitting for a few months, not overnight.

Try putting your hand over the air intake when starting - it will pull more gas that way! Also, probably goes without saying, but no throttle at all... it will reduce the amount of vaccuum and take longer to pull the gas through the lines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I haven't had foot on gas, for reason you described. I'll try putting my hand over the air intake tomorrow... even if that works, seems like there might be something mechanical causing this to happen. Any ideas on what else it could be?
 

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Mine started doing this so i decided to add a primer bulb so i could prime the system before starting. When i did, i replaced the lines with clear lines, used hose clamps for a tight seal, and replaced the plastic T thats between the pump and motor with a brass one. Afterwards i didn't need the bulb. My assumption was i had a air leak allowing the fuel to leak back into the tank. You are supposed to have a fully sealed vacuum system, so if you have a pin hole somewhere in one of the lines, the whole system goes down. Good Luck.
 
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