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Discussion Starter #1
I have been working on a better (faster) way of securing my rhino in my truck. The old way of lasso strapping the wheels took me around 30min to get it secured.

This is what I came up with:




Its made from 1"x.125 square tubing, and 2" winches from US Cargo Control. It was powdercoated gloss black by colorcode in Gardena, Ca. I bought a set of mini demco basket wheel straps from pdqenterprises.net and have some bed bolts removable anchor points, but those have not been mounted yet. The bar also has a anchor point in the center in case I have to use the winch or tie down something else.

I will post some more pics when I get the rhino in there.
 

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You've got a Super Duty like mine. I use the hooks in the corner of the box with 2" straps to the frame of the Rhino. Usually never takes me more than 5 minutes.
 

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When I use the tire bonnets to strap the Rhino on my trailer I strap one front and the opposing rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #5


Strapped in.
next project is to make some mini ramps to make it easier to drive over the wheel humps. They are going to be 2" angle.
 

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Just wondering what the reason is for the rhino to ride on its own suspension? I strap mine to the lower part of the cage behind the doors to the front of the trailer. I compress the front suspension as much as possible similar to a motorcycle.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
By allowing the rhino to ride on its own it can absorb bumps in the road, also as a bonus the truck rides more smoothly since it acts as a mass damper. It also produces less of a load on the tie down points and on the straps since its only providing movement restraint without the load from the suspension
 

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You've got my attention... I'm simply trying to figure out how to get it in the truck safely.

Aside from that, there is another reason why one would want the suspension to float - that is when you compress the unit it puts preload on the shocks/springs. ...which for minor compression, and for a short while isn't a problem.

Compressing the entire unit's suspension for a day/days would (could potentially) have a long-term effect on shock performance.

So as a minor hijack, since I've never seen a Rhino loaded into a truck, can you tell me how it is done, what not to do ?

Seems that the over-the-wheelwell ramps would help the matter. I was thinking of a simple wood solution, but interested in your concept.
 
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