Yamaha Rhino Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my 06 660 suffers from a loss of fuel in lines when sitting for a while and thus needs to crank a bit to get loaded up with fuel again.

I have a Black Rhino style electric pump and think want to install it inline on the tank side of the lines prior to stock pump and wire it to energize off the start side of the starter relay so when the key is in start position it energizes the pump. That way from a safety point of view if there was ever a roll over the pump would not be energized if the car was not running.. Do any of you see any issue with this? Will the stock pump be able to pull fuel through the electric pump and keep the car running?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Have you looked at the rutting rhino fuel line kit? I have heard great things about it. Also, would a marine fuel bulb work to prime the system before starting?

Brett
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
You do realize that the pump will still be running if you roll over and, for some reason, can't shut the key off , right? In modern cars, the pump is tied in with an oil pressure switch. That way, if your motor dies, the pump will stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You make a good point but to avoid that the pump wont be running in a roll over as it will be tied into the starter and only run during start up to push extra fuel up is all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Kevin... NP.. I thought maybe you had missed that part.. my only concern ( have to try it I guess) is to find out if the oem pump will draw through the electric pump.. I did like your idea however if it needed to run all the time for a roll over cut out somehow.. I am hoping the start only will work frankly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,650 Posts
I have a Black Rhino style electric pump and think want to install it inline on the tank side of the lines prior to stock pump and wire it to energize off the start side of the starter relay so when the key is in start position it energizes the pump. ....
That is what I did recently to my Rhino. The only difference is that I got the power from the starter motor terminal, simply because it is right there in the neighborhood. I ran that power through an auto-reset circuit breaker so that if there was a short, the wiring would not burn up during the cranking.

The stock pump has no problem drawing fuel through the electric pump and the electric pump has no problem pushing fuel though the stock vacuum operated pump. This does help the long term drain-down of the fuel system, in that the electric pump will prime the stock pump while you are cranking. The lower the electric pump is, the better, as it then does not have to lift the fuel very far.





However, I'll make a prediction that, before long, someone will be on the market with something that will help a lot with these long term loss of prime problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Steve .. THAT IS AWESOME>> THANK YOU FOR PICS.. that is what I was thinking about and had not found pics yet .. I REALLY appreciate the help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
steve, one more question.. did you have to reduce the sizeof the pump hose down to the stock size? I think the stock size is 5/16 and my pump fittings are 3/8.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,650 Posts
.....did you have to reduce the size of the pump hose down to the stock size? ......
I'm afraid that I cannot realistically answer that question. I, long ago, revamped the plumbing with 'see-through' hose, so I am not using the stock rubber hoses. I am using 5/16" hose there, but different hoses stretch differently. I'm using the Purolator low pressure electric pump.

Oh, I actually recently upgraded to the Rutting Rhino plumbing as I re-installed this pump. The hoses are very nice and the hose bands work very nice with the urethane hoses. He gives very helpful advise in heating the thermoplastic hoses a bit to expand them slightly if need be.

One caution, however; make sure that the hose clamps everywhere are good and tight. All of the joints have to be bubble-tight or you will have increased long term drain-down due to air entering the system. It may look tight, with no fuel leakage, but still suck air.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top