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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New Member Here. I am looking to buy a UTV for hunting, working around the yard and cruising the neighboorhood and have a couple of questions. I am cheap by nature so I am leaning towards a used model. I have found the following:

2006 Yamaha Rhino 660 Special Edition. One owner. Blue, aluminum wheels, and just over 900 miles. Since new, this Rhino has been ridden rarely leaving a rural subdivision. It starts, runs, and drives basically like new. Everything works well as it should. It has the Yamaha bedmat in place, has very few dings and minimally scratched plastic. Overall, it looks better in person than in the pictures. You will be impressed with this Rhino -- it needs nothing. It came from the factory with the multi-function electronic speedometer/hour meter.

There are a couple of 1/2" slits on the side of one of the seats. One end of the front bumper has the plug somewhat caved in, if I haven't figured out a way to fix it by the time you pick it up. That's basically it for damage worthy of mention.

The pictures are attached.

I would love some advise on if you think this is a decent deal for the information provided, as well as some issues to be on the lookout for if I go see the machine.

I have never driven a Rhino, but I have used a ranger quite a bit. I know this is a Rhino forum, but I would also appreciate any feedback concerning the differences, pros/cons etc.

Thanks for helping a newbie
Josh
 

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I paid 7800 for almost exactly same ride in may 2009 for an 06-660-SE same color. Only difference was mine had yami OEM roof and jstrong windshield. no other mods or additions. my box was scratched up but plastics were and remain like new. I am very happy with my ride. I dont think the price is bad but others may have better more recent buying input. My take is if it as you say and you like it .. then do it.
 

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Thanks for the reply. Can you talk about how a machine like this would perform in a hunting situation. Particularly waterfowl hunting? I would be encountering a lot of mud, some creek crossings, etc. How is ground clearance?
 

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I confess I don't either mud with mine or do much deep water. I trail ride, use mine for firewood and work around our property(45 acres) plus what ever else. Ground clearance is very good and decent. I have been in significant mud on trails and never had any problems. Lots of guys use them for that kinda stuff so I believe it would be fine. the rear drive is more like a live full axle (no dif) so good traction. and selectable 4wd on the dash and front dif lock I have never been stuck with mine. I have the stock tires but lots of guys get tires that are deeper tread etc. I have made NO engine mods, but over 3 years added seizmik racks, rear soft windo, tonneau cover and modular doors, fender flairs, Jstrong roof, hdraulic dump in bed, second battery for stereo, HID lights for night riding and coyote hunting. , I am in process of adding collant heater to keep us warm in winter. Oh other thing I did was add aluminum floorboard, fender and cv guards. these things are awesome and the guys on this forum are SUPER guys to get to know and learn from there is NOTHING they dont know I have had SOOO much help from them. They know alot more than I ever could about these things.
 

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Oh btw.. I also meant to say that amongs all the sxs choices in the market the Yami is by far the best all around ride... Also the MOSt reliable that was the most important thing for me for sure.
 

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Oh btw.. I also meant to say that amongs all the sxs choices in the market the Yami is by far the best all around ride... Also the MOSt reliable that was the most important thing for me for sure.
X2 for sure. The Rhino, IMO, is the best all around utility vehicle. I don't think you'll have any issues using it for waterfowling. Good luck.
 

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The Rhino has a fully locked rear differential meaning both tires spin at the same speed even when turning. This is ok, except on lawns where a tight turn will quickly tear up the lawn. The Polaris Ranger's rear axle when in 2WD mode is unlocked giving an open rear axle that's easy on turf. The Rhino has the ability to lock the front and rear axles giving true 4WD. The Ranger relies on visco locking clutch packs and a cable operated differential locking mechanism which over time tends to become lose and out of adjustment. The Rhino's 4WD mechanisms are all controlled by the push button switch on the dash, there aren't any cables to break or wear out. The ranger's 4WD system is more or less just all wheel drive since the way its built there's no way to get full 4WD mode, most of the time only 2-3 tires will be spinning. The Ranger can tow and haul more supposedly, but I wouldn't count on it. The Rhino's CVT transmission keeps the belt at a constant tension all the time so the belt hardly ever slips. While the CVT transmission in the Ranger the belt is lose and only gets tensioned when RPM's are high enough to engage the clutches then the belt literally just snaps tight causing extreme wear and slippage of the belt. Also, the ranger's manual says to operate in low range when towing due to the amount of slippage.

IMO the Rhino is the best all around machine for utility, trails, offroad, etc. Even though the rhino can cause turf damage, I've learned to just make larger more graceful turns and not try to make sharp steering corrections to avoid the turf damage. That's the rhino's only downfall IMO.
 
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