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Hello. Just purchased used 07 660 (240 Hours on it) about a month ago. Allready had some problems with the fuel delivery. Previous owner put clear line and it was collasping so I replaced it. Yesterday it was running fine and I turned it off. Went to start it back up less than 5 minutes later and all it does is cranks. I pulled the plug and it was getting fire but I put a new one in anyway. Its getting gas but I shot some in the carb any way to make sure. Still no start. I know very little about Rhinos. But very mechanical. Any help in the right direction would be greatly appreciated. Thanks Darrell
 

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Update: Check the coil with multimeter. It pegs the multimeter when hooked to orange wire connector and ground
 

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Update: Check the coil with multimeter. It pegs the multimeter when hooked to orange wire connector and ground
Not at all sure what you are trying to do here. This was the spark plug coil (not the ignition pulse coil)? Ignition switch on? What function was the multimeter set at: AC Volts, DC Volts, Amps, Ohms? And what range?
 

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Not sure what Im doing either.lol Down loaded the manual on here and was checking the spark plug coil. The manual said to set it on Ohms x1 and reading should be 0.18-0.28.But it pegs it. But I had another coil from my 700 Polaris Sportsman 4 wheeler and it does the same thing. Like I said I dont much about Rhinos. I work on hotrods a lot though.But that dosnt seem to help with the Rhino.lol Puzzles me that Im getting fire and fuel and still no start. Also when trying to start it, if I give it gas it will backfire out the exhaust sometimes. Any help would be appreciated
 

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Not sure what Im doing either.lol Down loaded the manual on here and was checking the spark plug coil. The manual said to set it on Ohms x1 and reading should be 0.18-0.28.But it pegs it. But I had another coil from my 700 Polaris Sportsman 4 wheeler and it does the same thing. Like I said I dont much about Rhinos. I work on hotrods a lot though.But that dosnt seem to help with the Rhino.lol Puzzles me that Im getting fire and fuel and still no start. Also when trying to start it, if I give it gas it will backfire out the exhaust sometimes. Any help would be appreciated
OK, it looks like you have an analog (moving needle pointer) multimeter. A quicky lesson on that meter, if I may: Set the meter to the ohms range that you need (X1 in this case). This means the numbers on the Ohms scale on the meter face are read 'as-is' (X1). Look for the word Ohms on the meter face and it should be associated with a band of numbers in an arc across the scale. Sometimes just position, but often in a particular color, etc.

Now for calibration: short the two test leads together and you should see the needle move way up-scale. The end of the scale is marked as 0 (Zero) Ohms. There is an adjustment knob, or wheel, somewhere on the meter; probably called 'Zero Adjust'. Move that adjustment until it reads zero with the leads touching each other (as dead short is zero ohms). While we are here look at that scale and figure out where that .18 to .28 Ohms should be. Sometimes it is too close to the end of the scale to actually be able to see; if so, the multimeter is not usable for this measurement. Look for a X 0.1 setting, the meter might have one. It takes a pretty good multimeter to measure some of these extremely low values. At any rate, an accurate calibration of zero will be neccessary to actually make that measurment, assuming that the scale will let you see the difference between a dead short and the value that the coil is supposed to be.

The typical digital multimeter has the same sort of problem. If the reading involves the only last digit, it will be quite suspect. If you touch the leads together you will usually find that last digit fluctuating a couple of points around zero.
 

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Not sure what Im doing either.lol Down loaded the manual on here and was checking the spark plug coil. The manual said to set it on Ohms x1 and reading should be 0.18-0.28.But it pegs it. But I had another coil from my 700 Polaris Sportsman 4 wheeler and it does the same thing. Like I said I dont much about Rhinos. I work on hotrods a lot though.But that dosnt seem to help with the Rhino.lol Puzzles me that Im getting fire and fuel and still no start. Also when trying to start it, if I give it gas it will backfire out the exhaust sometimes. Any help would be appreciated
I have the same issue right now does anyone know what it can be or did you find the issue
 

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Hi. You say you had fuel and fire but it wasn't starting. I've had similar issues. I had assumed that compression was OK. Removed the plug and compression seemed good . A good rush of air under pressure. Decided to buy a tester and measure it. Only about 60 psi. Clearly wrong. Removed the cylinder head and cylinder bore. This exposed the piston. Removed gudgeon pin to release the piston from the con rod. The fault Issue was obvious. The compression rings were completely closed and tight and flush with the piston. Even now I can't see how this would have happened. Can only assume someone must have compressed them and left them compressed for some time on a work bench. After using wd40 and piddling with watch makers screw drivers i managed to free them and they expanded as they should.
A mate guided and lowered the cylinder bore down whilst I manualy squeezed the rings to get the piston back in the bore. After reassembling, the engine started up. Psi was now 160. So lesson i learned was don't assume there is good compression. Measure it. My second advice is to buy a good strobe light to check firing and timing. Whilst my engine started really well and ran smoothly after revving a few times and stopping the engine the timing light showed that it fired from start at around 10 degrees before tdc. Every minute on the clock face represents 6 degrees of advance so 10 or 12 deg before tdc is quite close to tdc when using a strobe light. After revving up it advanced but would not restore to 10 degrees at tick over. So I have to find out what it is. My advice therefore is to check your timing with a light whilst turning the engine over. Look where it illuminates. Assume you have some painted timing marks on the top side cover and on the pull start ?
 
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