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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, new to this site. I work for a company that does work on the beach and in marine environments. We have an 08 Rhino 700 and have been using it for the last 4 years without any issues.

Heard the expression, "When it rains it pours"? It seems that way as corrosion has caught up with us this year. Already replaced the stator this summer. Just broke a rear shock. Replacing the rear shocks resulted in replacing both bottom control arms/ a-arms, all bushings, sleeves, and hardware. Go to take it for a test drive and boom! The front lower a-arm where it mounts to the frame completely fails, see image attached.

At this point im wondering what to do? Should we replace the entire frame or just have it welded back? Looking like we are going to have to the entire front end suspension now in addition to whatever else we can do with the frame.

Any opinions or insight would be greatly appreciated. I have done some searching on the forum and found that there are aluminum arms available. Are there any other aluminum parts we could use?

We are doing all the labor in house, except for the welding.

Thanks in advance!
 

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I'd probably start by stripping the entire Rhino. Repair the rusty/broken sections, purchase/make/install a good gusset kit, have the frame sandblasted, coat with a zinc rich primer, and have it powder coated. If you keep fixing one spot at a time, then the rust and other repairs will be endless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Shes salty sir! Took it into a yamaha dealer this past summer when the stator went out. The mechanic said he was from Hawaii where plastic rusts but he said this was by far the rustiest Rhino he'd seen. We like to call her the rust bucket but we dont want to lose her!
 

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You can just weld it but knowing how bad the frame is do you really want to be tooling around in it? Just a matter of time before it breaks again.

You either need to buy a new frame or strip that down to the frame, fix the rust, and reinforce where necessary. New used frame would be a lot less work but if you weld and do the work yourself you can save some coin and still have a safe ride....rust is pretty bad but from that pic it doesn't look like it's unsalvageable.
 

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Hey everyone, new to this site. I work for a company that does work on the beach and in marine environments. We have an 08 Rhino 700 and have been using it for the last 4 years without any issues.

Heard the expression, "When it rains it pours"? It seems that way as corrosion has caught up with us this year. Already replaced the stator this summer. Just broke a rear shock. Replacing the rear shocks resulted in replacing both bottom control arms/ a-arms, all bushings, sleeves, and hardware. Go to take it for a test drive and boom! The front lower a-arm where it mounts to the frame completely fails, see image attached.

At this point im wondering what to do? Should we replace the entire frame or just have it welded back? Looking like we are going to have to the entire front end suspension now in addition to whatever else we can do with the frame.

Any opinions or insight would be greatly appreciated. I have done some searching on the forum and found that there are aluminum arms available. Are there any other aluminum parts we could use?

We are doing all the labor in house, except for the welding.

Thanks in advance!
Do not bolt aluminum directly to steel. You will end up with galvanic couples that will speed up any corrosion. Be sure that any dissimilar metal joints are electrically isolated from each other. The two metals, in contact, and within an electrically conductive liquid (salt water) act as a battery. Metal ions leave the cathode side and migrate to the anode side. The cathode side eventually dissappears.

As you can probably see from the picture, the corrosion is happening from the inside of the tubing to the outside. The inside is not painted, so there is no protection there. It also acts as a water trap holding the salty water to do its thing.

The other joints on the frame are probably doing the same thing and will fail before too long, as well.
 

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Thanks for the reply steve. Do you think a gusset kit and some more welding is going to help or is a new frame a better way to go?
Oh, it will probably get you running. But, before too long, it will happen again somewhere else. Keep in mind that you are welding stuff onto a frame that is likely thinned out from the inside. The safe thing to do would be to transplant everything onto a newer frame, perhaps along with new A-frames, etc. Then plan on doing it again within the same length of time that it took for this one to go.....

You might be able to find an intact 'roller' to do the transplanting onto. If you can find a way to wash it down with fresh water (inside and out) every time you take it out, you might be able to prolong the life of the replacement chassis.
 

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Maybe weld a bung onto the new frame and seal the frame everywhere and drill out a drain at the bottom of the tube framing.

Then have a hose connection in the bung and rinse with fresh water every month or so.
 

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I am a airframe mechanic and wing struts on a small plane have oil inside them to prevent corrosion on the inside of the tube. I would get a new frame weld up the open holes at the back of the frame that has plastic plugs in them usually the plastic plugs fall out. Weld any other open holes then pour oil into the frame it doesn't have to be full but enough to slosh around in the frame an keep it coated on the inside. I dont think that frame is worth repairing and I would hate to spend the money and time on a new frame and it happen again in 5 years
 
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