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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys I'm back. I just picked up a leftover (new) 08 and want a little more top end. On my previous 700 Rhino I installed a machined sheave and Dynatek cdi and was very pleased. A buddy just traded in his rhino and sold me his dragon fire cdi for $100 but I need to know what is a better route to go for the drive system mod: Coop45's mods or WV Hotrods machined sheave with greasless guts? Anyone have experiance with both?
 

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go Hot Rod

for ONE reason.

with the JBS sheave you will gw ultimate low end and awesome top end.

I'm actually out camping right now and I climbed a 4ft straight up ledge in m rhino NO problem, oh ya I was in HIGH not LOW.

you will jot be dissapointed and James Cust Serv. is #1

I was also can hit 56-59 on the too end.
 

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Hot rod, best of all worlds. Awesome product, awesome service.
 

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He has a couple, one is machined sheave, and then he has one where he cuts the ramps on the cam plate, changes the angles 2 mm and then rewelds them. His third I believe is where he welds wedges on the cam plate to get different angles on the ramps.
I don't think I would want to be cutting cam plates or welding ramps on it. Just my .02.
 

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I can say that I love my jbs sheave and As dbest said, customer service is number 1. Give him a call and u will find out for yourself, in 5 min u will feel like u have known him for 10 years. Its not like talking to a saleman, more like a good friend. Cannot not say for coop mods but would not change my setup. Best of both worlds top and bottom end for 1 low price.
 

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I can say that I love my jbs sheave and As dbest said, customer service is number 1. Give him a call and u will find out for yourself, in 5 min u will feel like u have known him for 10 years. Its not like talking to a saleman, more like a good friend. Cannot not say for coop mods but would not change my setup. Best of both worlds top and bottom end for 1 low price.
X2! Doesnt get any better for customer service and the Hot Rod sheave.
 
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You have gotta try it out, you will be more than happy. I have tried several different sheaves and James has the best by far. Rhinos are his passion and hobby not his job, that makes a big difference and sets him apart from his competitors. Plus his kids buy their own shoes. LOL
 

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JBS sheave. It's already been said but the low end torque you gain is amazing. Spots were my bike would bog down and feel like it was going to stall out with my old set-up. I just crawl through them now. I haven't even really used my low gear. My bike pulls really hard on the hills now. In the end its your choice but you can't go wrong with JBS.
 

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I have used the Coop45 sheave on a late model Grizzly with great results. They accomplish the same thing as the JBS Hot Rod sheave but use different methods.

The Coop45 mod #2 mills the face of the sheave. Doing so allows the belt to drop further down the primary sheave assembly for a lower starting ratio in the CVT. Coop's mod #3 is a series of small cuts on the outer ends of the cam plate. After cutting, the ends are bent in a very small amount and then rewelded. This forces the belt out further on the sheave for a higher top ratio.

EDIT:
Here's a pic of the cam plate installed in the sheave. Look closely and you'll see the cuts and the spot welds.



Coop45 and his mods are widely used in the ATV world with great success, particularly on the Suzuki CVT and Yamaha CVT. Mad Mike over on GrizzlyCentral does the Coop45 mods after Coop showed him the procedure and Coop stepped down for a while.

James with the JBS Hot Rod Sheave accomplishes a similar end result with a completely different method. He mills the inside of the primary sheave where the weights travel. Milling the roller channels deeper near the center of the sheave allows the cam plate to drop further into the sheave which lets the belt drop farther down into the primary sheave assembly for the lower starting ratio. He also uses the overdrive weights for the higher top ratio. These special weights force the cam plate to ride higher at the end of the sheave, pushing the belt higher in the sheave assembly for the higher overdrive ratio.

Who will give the lowest starting ratio? I don't know. The only way to find out is to pull the CVT cover and turn the sheave assembly counting the number of turns the primary makes to rotate the secondary one complete turn. I know on a Grizzly 550/700 a 3:1 ratio is about the max you can get before the belt will eat a hole in the cover.

With all this said, I have a Hot Rod sheave in my Rhino 700 and am pleased with it. The next time I have my CVT cover off, I'll gladly count the ratio. I do know that the Hot Rod sheave raised my belt up and out of the secondary several millimeters, so it's apparent that the ratio was lowered.

I'd be curious to see what kind of ratio different setups get:
Stock
Hot Rod
Hunterworks (new style)
Coop45

Counting the ratio is really the only way to know for sure who gets the lowest ratio. Granted there are other factors that influence the overall "feel" like back shifting and roller weight. But for some riders who slog deep mud with Outlaws often starting off from a dead stop in the slop, the low ratio is king. Your results and preference will vary when it comes to high-speed or sport riding.
 

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I have used the Coop45 sheave on a late model Grizzly with great results. They accomplish the same thing as the JBS Hot Rod sheave but use different methods.

The Coop45 mod #2 mills the face of the sheave. Doing so allows the belt to drop further down the primary sheave assembly for a lower starting ratio in the CVT. Coop's mod #3 is a series of small cuts on the outer ends of the cam plate. After cutting, the ends are bent in a very small amount and then rewelded. This forces the belt out further on the sheave for a higher top ratio.

EDIT:
Here's a pic of the cam plate installed in the sheave. Look closely and you'll see the cuts and the spot welds.



Coop45 and his mods are widely used in the ATV world with great success, particularly on the Suzuki CVT and Yamaha CVT. Mad Mike over on GrizzlyCentral does the Coop45 mods after Coop showed him the procedure and Coop stepped down for a while.

James with the JBS Hot Rod Sheave accomplishes a similar end result with a completely different method. He mills the inside of the primary sheave where the weights travel. Milling the roller channels deeper near the center of the sheave allows the cam plate to drop further into the sheave which lets the belt drop farther down into the primary sheave assembly for the lower starting ratio. He also uses the overdrive weights for the higher top ratio. These special weights force the cam plate to ride higher at the end of the sheave, pushing the belt higher in the sheave assembly for the higher overdrive ratio.

Who will give the lowest starting ratio? I don't know. The only way to find out is to pull the CVT cover and turn the sheave assembly counting the number of turns the primary makes to rotate the secondary one complete turn. I know on a Grizzly 550/700 a 3:1 ratio is about the max you can get before the belt will eat a hole in the cover.

With all this said, I have a Hot Rod sheave in my Rhino 700 and am pleased with it. The next time I have my CVT cover off, I'll gladly count the ratio. I do know that the Hot Rod sheave raised my belt up and out of the secondary several millimeters, so it's apparent that the ratio was lowered.

I'd be curious to see what kind of ratio different setups get:
Stock
Hot Rod
Hunterworks (new style)
Coop45

Counting the ratio is really the only way to know for sure who gets the lowest ratio. Granted there are other factors that influence the overall "feel" like back shifting and roller weight. But for some riders who slog deep mud with Outlaws often starting off from a dead stop in the slop, the low ratio is king. Your results and preference will vary when it comes to high-speed or sport riding.

Excellent post Chris! HAHAHA!!!!
 

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Ours would be the lightest rotating mass beacuse we take the most weight off the sheave ... which makes it rev a little quicker. no roller flop.no pressure on the weights under12-15 mph with our design.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I did the coop45 mod on my 700 Grizzly and am going to try James mod on my Rhino. Just took the sheave off and will ship it tomorrow.
 

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I did the coop45 mod on my 700 Grizzly and am going to try James mod on my Rhino. Just took the sheave off and will ship it tomorrow.
The hot rod sheave kicks ass! You won't regret it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
might as well put in a new belt and 22mm nut. then u have spares. JBS has it all!
The rhino only has 7 miles on her.
James; it's on the way. Shipped this am.
 
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