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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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Looking around, I see a lot of problems with starting and idling rough. 90% of the time it's a dirty carb. As soon as I got my Rhino home the first thing I did was remove the carburetor bowl and clean the jets. It's a 30 min process and makes a huge difference. It can easily be done without removing the carb from the machine.

What I did with the Rhino like I do on many other small engines is just twist the carb enough to access the bowl.

First drain the bowl using the small screw on the bottom of the bowl (make sure the drain tube is in a container).

Then loosen both clamps on the air intake tubes on either side of the carb and carefully twist it on it's side. Be carefull not to pinch any lines or pull any cables tightly.

Next remove the 4 phillips screws on the bowl, BE CAREFUL and use a proper fitting screwdriver as they strip easy. After the four screws are removed, you need to loosen the carb heater by unplugging the two wires and loosen the large plug just enough to twist the ground bracket so the bowl comes off easily.

Remove each jet carefully one at a time and clean them with some choke and carb cleaner ( GUMOUT® - Carb + Choke Cleaner) then blow them out with compressed air. DON'T use a small wire to clean out the jets, you will scratch the inside, disturbing the fuel flow.

Check the bowl for deposits and clean if necessary, some greenish buildup is common. It's Algae from this ethanol fuel.

Reinstall the bowl and tighten the four screws, tighten the carb heater and ground then reconnect the wires. Turn the carb back up straight and tighten the tube clamps.

Remember, you emptied the bowl so it will take a few seconds of cranking to fill the bowl and start. To prevent furthur fuel clogging, I run Sta-bil Marine Formula (Sta-bil Marine Formula) which is made for Ethanol treatment. I put it in any machine that will have fuel in it for more than 2 weeks.

Sorry I didn't get more pics, it was 30 degrees so I was working quickly. A more thorough overall cleaning of my machine is certainly needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you!

I tried the allen head screws on my RX-1 with 4 carbs to clean but it's tough to find them with small enough heads. I find you really only strip the factory set screws as they torque the hell out of them. Replace the originals with new phillips and tighten till they stop. There shouldn't be any problem stripping them after that.
 

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Although it can b a pain i would rather strip an aluminum screw than put steel screws on there and crack the alumimum bowl
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Yes, Aluminum and Steel don't match well. The oxidation between the two alone could make the screws impossible to remove. That's why even aluminum trailers have rubber pads between the frame and steel axle. But the carb screws are stainless steel.
 

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I use an ultrasonic cleaner, I use hot water @ 140 F and dish soap. It vibrates at 40000 hertz. Get them clean every time. If I have a screw or jet that's stuck I put it in for a 15 min cycle and then finish the dissassembly. Normally do 10 to 15 carbs a day.
 

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I always ran seafoam through my ATV's without fail, even when the fuel was left in the tank etc for an entire winter. After a few cranks it started right up.

I just used sea foam on my Rhino and now she is purring like a kitten.

Next to clean the "never under water or mud bogged" engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I always ran seafoam through my ATV's without fail, even when the fuel was left in the tank etc for an entire winter. After a few cranks it started right up.

I just used sea foam on my Rhino and now she is purring like a kitten.

Next to clean the "never under water or mud bogged" engine.
I personally worry about the effects of chemicals like Seafoam on gaskets, filters, sensors and rubber hoses but have heard both good and bad stories from it's use. Mostly good, sounds like a good product.
 

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I always ran seafoam through my ATV's without fail, even when the fuel was left in the tank etc for an entire winter. After a few cranks it started right up.

I just used sea foam on my Rhino and now she is purring like a kitten.

Next to clean the "never under water or mud bogged" engine.
I personally worry about the effects of chemicals like Seafoam on gaskets, filters, sensors and rubber hoses but have heard both good and bad stories from it's use. Mostly good, sounds like a good product.
I have been using Seafoam since about 1985 while in the USMC I had a 1968 Toyota Corona that had carb problems. Used that based on a suggestion from a dirt track racer, never looked back.

Prior to that I used GumOut for everything.

Everyone has their favorite product and your method is probably the best when nothing else will work.

Good writeup though.

JR
 

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Seafoam is sorta $$. I use transmission fluid. It's full of detergents and not only cleans the carburetor, but also removes carbon deposits from the head, piston, and valves. Get the cheap stuff and mix about 3 oz per gallon of gas. I also use Stabil at 3 oz per 5 gal and never have any fuel problems.
 

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The majority of Seafoam is Kerosene (paint thinner), a very small portion is petroleum naptha. So you are paying an extreme amount of money for the naptha. Products like Startron, Stabil and Lucas are 99% pure naptha so you are getting your monies worth there. If you are already using Stabil, there is no need to add the transmission fluid.
 
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