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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I do not have a Rhino but will need one for limited farm use by my wife and for hunting. I am not sure about the location where I can find the various features for the Rhino over the years. Do I bite the bullet for a new one or could I reasonably get by with a gently used one? Please point me in the right direction to get some information so that i can make a good choice and financially responsible.
Thanks,
 

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Welcome to the forum !!
There are a lot of good used machiness out there...they may or not be the particular color you're wanting, or the size you have in mind; but, there are some killer deals out there (you just have to find them). Depending on what part of the country you're in, there are some nice ones here on the forum. The good thing about buying second-hand is, some or all of the add-ons you have in mind may all ready be on the bike...that saves you money down the road. Unless you have decided on a 660, or 700...don't be predjudiced towards the 450...a friend of mine got a super deal on one that even included the same year model trailer !! His was the first one I had been on...I always figured they were dogs...I was VERY impressed !!
Whatever used one you may consider, look it over REALLY well...jack it up and check for worn bearings, check for oil leaks, if the tires are wearing even, shake the steering wheel back and forth for play, etc...you can usually tell if someone has taken good care of their stuff or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
newby

Thanks for the quick reply. We are in Minnesota and my wife says a hard top and a windshield is important. We will likely have a small tractor at our place so the rhino would be used for people moving, dragging deer, hauling fence repair supplies, light tools like chainsaws. Nothing too hard so I do not know if I need a 700 but I do not want to be disappointed later.
 

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You will find many uses for the Rhino after you get one. I bought mine to mainly cruise around the farm and county roads in. But I have used it for hauling trash to the dumpster and hopping in to run up the road, planting flowers, hauling firewood, building supplies, tools, ect. The Rhino is a very versatile vehicle.
 

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After looking at a 2008 Rhino 700FI with a couple mods on it the price was ok, but impossible to get financed for a used one but was able to get financed for a new model so I ended up with a 2011 Rhino 700FI. My only regret was not using my own bank, dealer financed through G.E. Capital which has turned out to be nothing but a nightmare in which they absolutely refuse to work with me on getting my payment date changed so I am in the process right now of waiting for them to come get the damn rhino. 2 payments in a row and absolutely no change to the balance due, they refuse to look into their problem, so away goes the rhino and a years worth of payments, it will suck to be them when they come get it though I have ripped everything off of it I've put into it so they're getting a 1 year old well used high mileage rhino completely plain.

You can find excellent deals out there but DO NOT purchase on the internet, always find one you are willing to drive to and personally inspect and drive. If they won't let you drive it, don't buy it.

Buy used if you can because as soon as you leave the dealer with a new model it becomes used and is no longer worth anything. Pay over $10k for a new machine and a month later its not even worth half of what you paid, the warranty is pointless so don't waste your time with a new machine if you don't have to. Do all the maintenance work yourself your dealer will rip you off for simple maintenance. $200 is no where worth the money for an oil/filter and lube.

As for year to year changes, there aren't really any major ones. I know the very first models sometimes didn't have the digital gauge readout they had idiot lights instead, as the digital gauge cluster was an option back then. The 450, and 660's are no longer made, if you buy new your getting a 700FI. After dealing with the constant carb issues on my Yamaha Grizzly 450 with the idle self adjusting and never staying set I have found that the fuel injection is very nice no adjustments regardless of what elevation you ride. Capacity wise I think they're all the same so it doesn't matter which model you get you can haul and tow the same, just not as fast with the 450 or 660.

In the past 1 year and 3 months of ownership of my rhino I can honestly say its the best UTV on the market for backwoods offroad use. As for trying to use it for utility purposes its ok as long as you don't mind damaging your lawn if you try to make sharp turns as the rear axle is fully locked so there's no slipping of the rear differential to allow easy turns and save whatever surface your operating on. However, if you get a Rhino stuck your in some pretty nasty terrain.

I try and not abuse my equipment, I work my a** off to purchase and can't afford fixing it if it breaks, but I've had my rhino in some pretty nasty conditions hunting this past year and I was amazed where it went with worn out tires in 2WD. I've also moved my 23 foot 2200lb car trailer a couple times with it (yes the actual rated capacity for towing is 1212lbs, and a 110lb tongue weight) the rhino did it with no hesitation so if and when you do purchase a rhino regardless of which one you decide rest assured its going to perform great for whatever you throw at it.
 

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Esoxguy, welcome to the forum! Here's a warning: do not buy a Rhino! It will start off as "just a bit of work on the farm and for hunting", then will gradually move into an addictive obsession taking up all of your spare time and money. Trust me on that. There's probably a 12-step program out there for us Rhino owners, but I'm not ready to quit yet.

If you decide to ignore my warning, here's some advice. Get a 700. It's EFI, and everyone complains about not having enough power. So if you're just doing a bit of work on the farm and hunting, it'll be great.

The 700's are mostly the same between years (2008-2010). The 2011+ have a slightly different seat belt setup, with a couple of extra brackets on the roll bar. New Rhino's come with rear wheel spacers and no rear swaybar. Also the cigarette-lighter plug is different on the back, which you won't see unless you go looking for it. That's about all I could tell between my Rhino and my friends' Rhinos.

If you get a fancier model, you will get various colour and graphic enhancements, LED tail lights with reverse lights, and aluminum wheels. But for your intended purpose, I'd just go with the standard model.

I bought a gently-used one in excellent shape with low hours and miles, and saved about $4000 off the price of a new one. Mine came with a roof and windshield and rear soft window. Definitely nice in the fall and winter and especially when it's raining, and I even kept them on through the summer as the heat was still tolerable.

If you get a windshield, make sure it has the hard coating on both sides. Mine is the Yamaha unit, and it works great and doesn't get scratched. I did start to lose the quick-release fasteners, so I replaced them all with Allen-head bolts and Nylocks.

One upgrade I do recommend is a set of aftermarket tires. The stockers "may" be just fine for you, but I recommend something like 25" or 26" Maxxis Bighorns (you can run them on your stock rims). The stock 25" tires are actually less then 25" tall, so you'll gain a bit of ground clearance and some traction. The stockers are also 4-ply rated I believe, and most aftermarket tires are 6-ply or 8-ply rated, which means they will be more resistant to punctures, and won't roll sideways as much in the corners. I am running a set of 26" Bighorns and have found that they work great in pretty much all terrain, including snow. They aren't as good in mud as a dedicated mud tire, but they are much smoother on hardpack than the agressive tread pattern of a mud tire will allow, which would be beneficial on forestry and fire roads when you're hunting. But if the terrain in your area and on your farm is more muddy than hardpack, do consider more of a mud tread pattern. Anyways, I thought I'd mention tires to you so that you can factor them in when figuring out your finances.

Of course, the above is just my opinion from my experiences.

Hope this helps you.
 

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esox guy. I purchased an 066 660 SE used in 08 barely used. Mine had a jstrong windshield and yamaha hard top. Nice machine. Since then I have done a bunch of stuff but the most notable has been HID lighting conversions all around (inexpensively) 2cond battery. Jstrong roof, heater, preheater, Siezmik- doors, racks and exoshelll rear bumper, bunch of other things. we love this crazy thing.
If you get one you will not be disappointed if you find a good clean and reasonable deal. My only suggestion is to echo what has been said. get a 700EFI as a minimum, no need to buy new. take care of it and it will take care of you.. Cannot praise Yami enough for a great machine, fun time and reliable get me there and back.
 

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esox: I am guessing that regionally the variation in how many and what they have on them (aftermarket) is going to vary significantly.

I found asking price for pre-08 (pre-EFI) units was only marginally less than the almost new unit I found (32 hours, 229 miles) for the 08 (EFI) for $8K.

The reason of course was the add-ons. I have since added a number of items and accessories totaling ~ $850 (full doors, windshield, rear window, Bimini top, Simpson harness/bar) and I'm looking at another $1.2k for a radio, tailgate extension and street legal kit.

So while my intentions are for a psuedo farm vehicle, the sport-fun factor is not easily denied ( as Thunderbolt eloquently pointed out). ...and now (or before too long), we'll be ready to go adventure riding in it ! Backpacking with an engine !

Edit: I will echo Expo's commendation to the Yamaha product. There may be some exceptions, but in general Yamaha has been forthright in Customer satisfaction.

Good luck on the search... Report back with what you get !
 
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