Yamaha Rhino Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys, a few of us are going to do a run in the sand tanks and i will need to run on I-8 for a few miles (will be in jeep convoy). I have a clutch kit on my 700 and can do 50 right now and wanted to know if i got a dynatek CDI if i will run in the 60's? i found one used here in phoenix but i wanted to check with you all first as you guys are the best.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,853 Posts
mph

to run for five miles in the sixties with stock size tires just means you're going to blow it up and spit the guts on the asphault, wouldn't run it that fast for that long with a stock piston and rod if I was you....sheave,cdi,pipe,small cam,rejet will run about 63 from what I've seen,takes a little while to get there but it will run that, but I sure wouldn't hold it there for five miles worth of street, yikes!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,228 Posts
I do have the machined sheeve so that should help. So what is the dynatek box for then?
The 700 with a sheave will do 50 at the factory rev limiter as you already know...

The Programmable MSD ecu for the 700 will allow you to remove the rev limiter and modify the fuel curve (if needed due to mods or whatever)...

Your rhino will do 55ish top speed at full throttle rev-limited only by hp/lb ratio...to get more you will need exhaust etc...

However, as camshaw says... holding the it at full throttle for extended periods of time is really asking for a completely grenaded motor...

So in reality... your case... being on the hwy for miles... the factory rev limiter is forcing you to back off the throttle to what would be your "safe" (nothing is safe...just speaking in relative terms) cruising speed even if you had a much higher top speed...

In order to 'cruise' at 60 or close to it for 5 miles with a reasonable amount of reliability... your machine would have to have a crank-up built motor with a top speed of around 67ish...then you could run 60 at a relatively low throttle setting...

RPMs are certainly part of the problem with regard to reliability of the motor but it is primarily the throttle setting that will kill the motor...

Think of the throttle as the flame control knob on a propane torch and the flame is pointed at the center of our piston and applying the most intense heat right to the weakest link in the chain...

Full throttle is the hottest flame the torch can deliver...how long do you want to apply that flame to your weak link while it is at the same time moving at SEVEN THOUSAND REVOLUTIONS PER MINUTE

That is why the sand dunes is the hardest place on any of these type motors...it's because even with a relatively low rpm and speed the throttle is held wide open for extended periods of time...all day and half the night... :)
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top