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2008 Rhino 700, same old story from what i can read, it won't charge the battery. Unplug the battery terminal and it dies. Only 2044 miles with no accessories. I've searched this forum trying to figure out how to test the stator with a ohm meter. The 3 white wires coming from stator reads .7 to .8 ohms from all wire to wire, but it also reads to ground from each of the wires. Don't really know if it's testing ok or not. Any help to help save me from spending hundreds of bucks would be very helpful and thankful.
Thanks
 

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http://i.b5z.net/i/u/1460326/i/HW_Yamaha_Rhino_HO_Stator_Rectifier_Instructions.pdf




Troubleshooting
Once your installation is complete and you think it is not charging the way it is supposed
to, do these things before calling.
1. Test#1 Unplug the round plug on the HO stator and measure the AC not DC
voltage on all three legs to see if they are as the following chart says. Measure the
voltage in between each of the three legs. Start with the negative lead on one, wire
and the positive lead on one of the other then the other. Complete circle checking
all of them. The engine must be running at high idle for at least 25 seconds before
testing. The voltage is lower than stock but the amperage is higher.
Stator output in ac
1000 7.6
2000 15.0
3000 22.4
4000 29.6
5000 36.9


2.
Test #2 With all the electrical accessories off, measure the voltage at the battery,
at idle you should get some where between 11.8 and 12.5 anything above idle it
should start to rise to nearly 15volts.
Electrical Pointers
If you still run your battery down after you installed our HO stator and you have a good
many electrical accessories you might still have too many accessories for the system.
The point is:
Remember it is 500 watts, while it is more than double the stock system you still cannot
run too many accessories.
The following is from one of our tech articles off our forum at www.ridesidebyside.com
Dual Batteries:
Basically this is a good idea but only if you have the HO stator/rectifier and the
reason is the lack of charging capacity in the stock system. If you must have a dual
battery set up make sure you use a battery isolator so the system can charge them
independently. Connect all your accessories to the aux battery, that way if you run
the aux battery down it does not affect your starting battery. For your aux battery,
don't use a big automotive battery as it will use a large portion of the charging
capacity just to charge it. I personally use yellow top optima in the small form factor.
I forget the number I think it is 24. If you don't have our HO stator and you still
want to install an aux battery still use the isolator but charge it at home with an
external battery charger.
If you add a second battery to your vehicle and simply connect them together
without an isolator then when the vehicle is not running the second battery will drain
power from the starting battery because it is smaller and you won't be able to start
it. Either put an isolator on there or keep a trickle charger on there when not in use.
Extra lighting:
Use HID lights not halogen or regular incandescent lights they draw too much power.
On the stock system if you just add two 55 watt lights and nothing else to the
electrical system, you are already going backwards on the battery. Two HID lights
draw 60 watts together and put out an amount of light equal to two 100 watt lights
so you would be safe with two HID lights on the stock system.
Connecting electrical accessories:
Most of the time you want to wire the accessory directly to the battery and use a
relay, fuse and a switch to turn it on. Never power any accessory off any of the stock
wiring it is too small and will cause you problems. The only thing I power off the
stock system is the relays. What is a relay you might ask; basically it is an
electrically operated switch. Say you have several high amperage lights that need a
heavy wire to supply the power and the current is too much for a toggle switch and
you want them to turn off when you turn the key off. First off you have to figure
which terminals on the relay do what. For more information on relays click the link
below.
http://www.bcae1.com/swrelay.htm
1. Connect the heavy gauge wire to the battery to a terminal on the relay; connect
another heavy wire from the relay to the lights. The number to which you connect
these two wires depends on whether you have a four or five terminal relay. For this
application I would use a four terminal and it would not matter which of the
remaining terminals you use as you are simply closing the internal contacts between
the two. If you use a five terminal relay for this, one of the terminals won't be used.
2. Then connect a smaller wire from a wire on the vehicle that is hot when the key is
on to the toggle switch then to the relay terminal numbered 85. On a rhino most all
brown wires are keyed hot.
3. Lastly connect a ground wire to the relay on terminal 86; again this is normally a
smaller wire because relays only use a very small amount of current to operate.
So what you end up with is; the lights won't turn on unless the key is on. Once the
key is on, turn the toggle switch on and the lights will come on, but if you forget to

turn the switch off they will go off when
you turn the key off because of the relay.
This set up also does not put any additional loads on the stock wiring harness.
It really doesn't matter if it is lights, stereos, air compressors or whatever you will
basically want to connect the accessories in the same manner. Of course a stereo
and most amps have an internal relay so they have two power wires, one for the
battery and one for a keyed hot wire.
On the Hunterworks Rhino we have the following accessories on there and
everything runs fine. We do have our HO stator on there, yellow top optima, battery
isolator and a volt gauge for each battery.




 

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2008 Rhino 700, same old story from what i can read, it won't charge the battery. Unplug the battery terminal and it dies. Only 2044 miles with no accessories. I've searched this forum trying to figure out how to test the stator with a ohm meter. The 3 white wires coming from stator reads .7 to .8 ohms from all wire to wire, but it also reads to ground from each of the wires. Don't really know if it's testing ok or not. Any help to help save me from spending hundreds of bucks would be very helpful and thankful.
Thanks
You have a 700, so it is a little different to describe than a 660. Be sure that your battery is well charged as you will be running the machine without a charging system for this test. The battery should measure 12.7 volts with the ignition off and the battery having sat unused for perhaps 1/2 hour.

The ohmmeter test for the stator coils is problematic for most ohmmeters in civilian hands. The resistance values are so low that the ordinary meter cannot accurately measure it, as the lead resistance and scale cannot measure down to tenths to hundredths of an Ohm. However, you can use an ordinary ohmmeter to make sure that there is no short to ground. Disconnect the connectors carrying the White wires from the wire harness. You will find these connectors down on the belly pan on the passengers side. There is a connector carrying a single white wire and a connector carrying 2 white wires. Inspect and clean the connector halves to ensure that there is no corrosion or crud in there, especially on the contacts. With the ohmmeter check for a short between all 3 of the white wires and ground (engine case). This has been the problem on occasion. If it is indeed shorted you probably need a new stator, or at least find and repair the short.

The more common problem is at least one shorted or open coil within the sets. Start the engine and let it idle. Use the multimeter set in the appropriate range to measure around 20 Volts AC (NOT DC). Put one probe on the stator side single white wire and the other probe on one of the white wires on the stator side dual pin connector. You should see around 20 V AC. Move the probe on the dual pin connector to the other white wire on that same connector. You should again see 20 V AC. Last, put the probes between the 2 white wires on the dual pin connector. If you see 20 V AC there as well, the stator is working as it should. If the stator is OK, look for problems in the connectors and/or wiring up to the Rectifier/Regulator. All 3 combinations of the 3 white wires should have around 20 Volts AC for the stator to work.

This is for a stock stator, the "high output" aftermarket stators do not charge the battery unless the engine is revved rather high. I am not much of a believer in them, unless you are going so fast that you always get back to the charging station before dark..... :fingersx:
 
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