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Discussion Starter #1
Posted this in my 'New member' post but a week later and 31 views I've not had a response so hoping for better luck here. Just bought my first Rhino, a 2011 700 and found a couple of issues:



Front diff seal leaking a bit - how easy is this to do? Should I replace pinion etc while I'm at it just in case? Or best to just keep topping up with gear oil?!


Front lower wishbone dinged - obviously hit a rock sometime, bent out of line about 3/16" so must be affecting the geometry a bit - but we're not talking highway driving/tires so anything to worry about?



Parking brake doesn't work - I've tried adjusting all slack out of the cable but no go. I've looked at the actuating mech' on the caliper and it looks like the arm is stopping against a 'tab' preventing any further movement of pads. Is this just a matter of moving the arm back a bit?


Thanks for any help
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You can change the axle seal fairly easy by just removing the axle and changing the seal. To change the drive shaft seal you will have to pull the diff out and that kind of sucks but still is not a bad job.


I would change the lower a arm if bent seeing how the parts are not that expensive and if it is on the same side as the seal you want to change, you will already be there.


The parking brake actually has a mod where you can cut that tab a bit so you get more travel with the cable. But adjustment is done with the arm that bolts onto the caliper.
 

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You can change the axle seal fairly easy by just removing the axle and changing the seal. To change the drive shaft seal you will have to pull the diff out and that kind of sucks but still is not a bad job.


I would change the lower a arm if bent seeing how the parts are not that expensive and if it is on the same side as the seal you want to change, you will already be there.


The parking brake actually has a mod where you can cut that tab a bit so you get more travel with the cable. But adjustment is done with the arm that bolts onto the caliper.

Pay attention to the last sentence (above). The way I set them up is to remove the caliper and place in a bench vice. Grind of the stop tab as previously mentioned. Locate a thick washer that equates to the thickness of your disk rotor. With (new) pads installed place the washer between them to simulate the rotor. Now adjust the cable arm (it is on an acentric that moves the caliper piston in/out). Once adjusted re-install assy on Rhino - you may have to reset the brake lever cable now that the caliper arm is properly set. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That is truly a lot of work everytime you want to adjust. The mod involves removing the caliper once and grinding half the stop tab off(directions were on here somewhere). The rest of the adjustment is easy by loosing the lock nut,turning the piston stud until it touches the disc,then back off the piston stud a little,now put the arm back on as far back as you can get it as to get the most travel out of it,tighten down nut. Pull e brake lever. If lots of play yet, loosen lock nut and turn piston stud to take up the slack ,tighten lock nut. All without removing the caliper. The only time you need to remove the caliper is to put pads on it.
 

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adjusting park brake

The threaded bolt that the cable attaches to can be adjusted without removing the brake caliper.
Check the brake pad to be sure it is not worn out. If pad is not worn out loosen the locknut on the threaded
bolt that the cable turns. This bolt can be turned inward to compensate for wear on the brake pad. If the pad is worn out
this IS NOT the fix
. If pad is ok but brake does not hold this is a reasonably easy adjustment. Loosen the lock nut
and turn bolt inward till pad makes contact, then back off and lock down so it doesn't drag. Some trial & error is necessary.
Most wear on the park brake pad comes from forgetting to release said brake. If it's adjusted correctly and APPLIED
snug you can't move till you release it. I did not even have to grind the tab down. A small adjustment to the actuating center bolt in the caliper restroked the brake nicely. The pad on mine was just worn down enough that it didn't hold diddly.
 
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