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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, everyone. First time poster here. My father had a 2009 Rhino 700 that he bought a few months before he passed away two years ago. I have more experience with working on cars than ATVs, motorcycles, etc. It has been started off and on over the past few years but not too much extent. Recently, I have had struggles keeping it running. For the longest time, it would turn over but wouldn't start. I finally got it to start but it would die within a second or two. I started out with the simple things, draining the fuel and putting fresh gas in, replacing the plug, checking the air filter, etc. When that didn't help, I decided to replace the fuel pump because my research indicated that was a common issue. Now that I've done that, I do see an improvement. It will start and run for 15-20 seconds and then die again, struggle to start, and then repeat the cycle. I thought maybe the injectors were clogged so I ran a bit of injector cleaner through. It has been backfiring off and on during this process. At this point, I'm not sure what else I should be looking for. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know there is an in-tank filter that I changed when I changed the pump. Is there an external filter as well?
 

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Actually from what I can tell the 700s do not have a filter - other than the one you changed in the tank. I'm wondering if the fuel pump relay may be the culprit? When you first turn the key on (without starting it) you should hear the fuel pump engage for 2-3 seconds - this is to prime the system. Once the engine starts the relay should get a signal from (ignition controller?) to once again engage the fuel pump. Maybe there is a fault with getting the signal to the fuel pump relay? Just brain storming here but may give you a path to check out. Maybe put a test light on the load side of the relay to see if the voltage to the pump is dropping out.
 

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2009 Yamaha Rhino 700 Sport Edition
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I know there is an in-tank filter that I changed when I changed the pump. Is there an external filter as well?
The 2009 700 FI only have a fuel filter in the tank. No external filter. Just like a car you’re looking at 3 things, fuel, spark or air. Did you pull the spark plug and replace that? Is your air filter clean? Besides that then check what Sandbuster said. Make sure the fuel filter is getting re engaged after it primes. With the seat out you should be able to here it prime when you turn your ignition on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Reply all. Good morning and thank you for the responses. The plug was changed a few weeks ago. I pulled it again yesterday and it already is showing carbon build up. The air filter appears to be clean. As for the fuel pump, it is certainly priming. I’m not as certain about if it is staying on after ignition. I see several relays in the battery box but can’t seem to find a diagram indicating which relay is which. Any insight into which might be for the fuel pump?

I also have some concern about the plug itself. I’ve checked and I’m getting power to the boot but when I had the plug out of the cylinder, I was seeing no signs of spark so I suppose the new plug could be bad.
 

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Not sure how you're testing for spark at the plug but, with plug in hand shove it back into the plug wire, hold it firmly against a good ground and have someone crank the engine over - you should see a nice strong bluish spark. Here's a page from the manual - hope it's readable.

65052
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks, guys. I'm still trying to figure it out. I've confirmed spark and swapped the fuel relay. Unfortunately, it continues to start and immediately die. I had drained the tank when I swapped pumps but I'm wondering if it had some residual bad gas in it. At this point, I'm not sure what else to try. After a few minutes of trying to get it started, it just reeks of exhaust fumes. I thought maybe the exhaust had gotten clogged up by some mud daubers or something but I'm not aware of a good way to find that out.
 

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2009 Rhino 700, Hunters Edition
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Thanks, guys. I'm still trying to figure it out. I've confirmed spark and swapped the fuel relay. Unfortunately, it continues to start and immediately die. I had drained the tank when I swapped pumps but I'm wondering if it had some residual bad gas in it. At this point, I'm not sure what else to try. After a few minutes of trying to get it started, it just reeks of exhaust fumes. I thought maybe the exhaust had gotten clogged up by some mud daubers or something but I'm not aware of a good way to find that out.
The spark plug indicates a rich condition, which could be a result of inadequate air supply. I had a similar problem that unbeknown to me was a result of me installing the air filter upside down. Doing so chokes off the air supply. I would first check the air filter position. If that doesn’t fix it, remove the PVC hose at the air box ahead of the throttle body. If it runs normal, or at least better, with the engine drawing air through the open pvc valve nipple you know you have an air obstruction somewhere upstream of the throttle body. Good luck.
 

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check your airbox intake. Mine on my Yamaha big bear was completely clogged by a dirt dauber nest. That caused to it crank run a few seconds and then quit. It wouldn't crank until It had set for a several minutes to let the vacuum leak back down. An easy test is try to run it with the airbox cover off.

When it is running for the few seconds when it cranks, hold your hand in front of the exhaust and see if you feel air coming out. That will tell you if the exhaust is clogged.
 

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I know it is against typical protocall but take the filter out and see if it runs ok. Maybe you left a paper towel in the intake and it sucked into the Throttle body???? it could happen lol. But pull intake and look down into the throttle body at throttle plate, open plate up and see inside the head to the valve stems, to see if you have ingested some debris via rodents or insects.
 

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I know it is against typical protocall but take the filter out and see if it runs ok. Maybe you left a paper towel in the intake and it sucked into the Throttle body???? it could happen lol. But pull intake and look down into the throttle body at throttle plate, open plate up and see inside the head to the valve stems, to see if you have ingested some debris via rodents or insects.
This reminded me of Nascar drive Terry Labonte having similar issues. Twice in one year his engine blew up at the end of races that he had dominated due to hotdog wrappers getting sucked into his air intake. He said, " I'll never eat a @$#[email protected] hotdog again."
 
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